General News

  • History of 11 Greek Street

    Greek Street, running from Shaftsbury Avenue to Soho Square, most likely gained its name from the Greek Church (later St. Mary’s) built in 1677. The church was on the site formerly known as Hog Lane and it appears in Hogarth’s satirical ‘Noon’ from his ‘Four Times of Day’ series. St Marys Church. Courtesy of British […]

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  • History of 7 Carlisle Street

    Carlisle Street, established in around 1865, gets its name from the mansion built in the mid 1680’s on the site of what is now Nos. 10–12, at the west end of the street. It was occupied from 1725 to 1752 by the Countess of Carlisle and her genteel residency of this property attracted a number […]

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  • History of 28 Bruton Street

    The name Bruton Street derives from Lord Berkeley of Stratton whose ancestors were known as the Berkeleys of Bruton. The street has maintained its genteel and royal connections ever since; John, the second and “great” Duke of Argyll, who in the reign of William III, was Ambassador in Spain, resided in Bruton street in the […]

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  • William Blake Feature

    History of 52 Broadwick Street

    Broadwick Street. Courtesy of John Snow Matrix Broadwick Street in Soho was originally divided into two separate streets that extended across four estates. Building began in the eastern end in 1686, spreading gradually to the west and completed in 1736. It was during the end of the street’s construction in around 1720, that numbers 52-54 […]

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  • History of 20 Bedford Square

    Originally designed to be called ‘Bedford Circus,’ to mirror the King’s Circus in Bath; the site of Bedford Square was acquired by Thomas Wriothesley after the dissolution of the monasteries in 1545. As with Bloomsbury Square; the land gradually passed into the Southampton family and finally onto the Duke of Bedford. Bedford Square is one […]

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